Posts Tagged‘Consciousness’

Do Nothing, Change Everything

If you had to place a dart on the picture above representing levels self-awareness, where would it land? Are you aware you’re angry? Do you spend most of your time being angry? Are you ashamed of some things about yourself? Are you aware of any fear? Had you asked me twenty years ago (and I had been truthful), my self-awareness dart would have landed somewhere on the wall—not even on the board. I was relatively unconscious and unaware of any suffering. I was numb and told everyone “I was fine.” This is often what unconsciousness feels like. Ironically, because I was…

‘Tis the Season to Do All Stuff We Will Regret In January, Falalala Crap, Lala, Lalaa

It’s mid-October, and I’ve already managed to run over a Christmas display with my shopping cart at the grocery store. Most of me believes it was an accident, yet there is a part of me that felt something twisted and naughty toward the cardboard Santa I flattened. I love the holidays, don’t misunderstand; but I also realize that for many, holidays are fraught with repressed emotion, easily activated by the traditions of the past. A special holiday song, a scent, or even a cardboard Santa can trigger the hard stuff, particularly if we’ve experienced a recent loss or are living with unaddressed emotional pain. The part of me that felt a tingly, pleased sensation after my encounter…

Trying Versus Doing: Yoda’s Perspective

“Do or do not; there is no try,” was the advice given to young Luke Skywalker, when he told master Yoda he would try. According to an online dictionary, the word try means an attempt to do something one has not done, and Luke was attempting something new. So, why was Yoda admonishing Luke for trying? Isn’t trying a good thing? The wise Yoda reminded the young Jedi that once the decision is made to try, it’s important to whole-heartedly commit to the doing. From a spiritual perspective, the word try is an oxymoron because trying to do something new and doing something…

The Unspoken Burden of Children

This is one of the most important posts I’ve written in a while—at least, it feels like it. It’s about children and is specifically for the parents of children. I believe children are our most precious and vulnerable members of society; they simply cannot exist alone. They are also the most truthful witnesses of society. As parents, who we are for our children directly affects their trajectories. To speak to parents about their children is the most sacred thing I do; I feel the pressure to be honest yet never diminish the efforts of parents or children and their unique,…

Understanding the Universal Desire for Perfection

As compassion awakens, we find ourselves in a new land—or at least it feels that way. This new land is one where the rules are apparent and you are guided easily through the journey. It is a place where dreams don’t die in the daylight; we manifest with ease. It is a place of power, beauty, and abundance. It is a place of peace and kindness. Alice called it Wonderland; Dorothy called it home. Either way, there’s no place like it. Right now, you are likely calling this perfect place “there”—where you’ll be healthy, happy, rich, famous, safe, and secure, here on Earth. I commonly refer to…

Are Empathy and Compassion the Same? A Treatise

Okay, this is not technically a treatise; it’s more like a few paragraphs about very important ideas that confuse people (me) at times. Many people use compassion and empathy synonymously. They are light years apart in terms of mind/body states. I think we get confused because we practice one to get to the other. We dare to look at the suffering of others (empathy) to awaken this powerful state (compassion) that we scarcely remember. When we practice empathy as a response to witnessing another human suffering, we are relating to that person through similar feelings of suffering. In this way, we awaken our…

COMPASSION

A compassionate response to a friend or loved one who is suffering is a powerful, effortless, and perfect response of knowing. So the question is, if compassion requires “knowing,” how can we be compassionate if we don’t feel as if we know answers about their situation? How can we be compassionate with ourselves and heal our own lives? Compassion is an ascended posture of knowing, but I left out the good part.  This “magical ascended knowing posture” is also your authentic self.  The big epiphany we awaken to is that we don’t know how to be compassionate because we don’t know ourselves (or we are afraid to be ourselves in…